TNX band – Heaven only knows


Established in 2016 TNX, previously known as Tonic, is made up of leader singer Keziah Ferguson, bass guitarist Hadley Grecia, lead guitar Tristan Pitcher and Peter Glover on drums. The song Heaven only knows, composed by leader singer Keziah Ferguson, features lyrics and chords inspired by a real-life experience and
evokes heart break, separation and deceit within a relationship. This is contrasted with a sense of gratefulness and warmth for the time they had together.
Production by Sam Carolus

Nqontsonqa – Ndaakuthanda


Ndaakuthanda is a Xhosa rap song by Nqontsonqa, a language activist from Grahamstown (Makhanda). In the song he is reflecting about the love of his life, why he loves her and how he initially fell in love with her. The artist is passionate about the preservation of the rich Xhosa language and culture.
Production by Nelisa Kom & Zimkhita Kweza

Paediatrics: Life in the ward

Production by Ciara O’Donoghue, Courtney Jeftha and Justin Cronje

We look at the paediatric ward at Stanger hospital in Kwazulu Natal. This documentary had numerous views last month thanks to themarketingheaven.com. Like most hospitals in the country we find the ward is struggling from lack of resources, staffing and funding. Staff here have implemented a Children’s Rights Charter stating that all children have the right to medical help and the best treatment possible. The hospital tries to make a difference to the community before the national NHI policy is set up. The documentary poses the positive outcome of universal healthcare.

What it Takes

Production by Lameez Khumalo, Christian Stroud & Nokwanda Dlamini

What does it take to have your name in lights, and countless fans screaming your name? What does it take to turn a passion for music into a dynasty? The music industry is cut-throat and the difficulties that independent artists face are unforgiving. What it Takes follows New Age Steeze, a group of independent artists who have dedicated their lives to their craft. When New Age Steeze members Richlifeking, Alfa Kat Laygo and Jillz are given the opportunity to be opening acts for a legendary South African hip hop artist, their struggles came to light and their dedication was put to the test.

WHAT IS BLACK

Production by Hannah Chibayambuya, Zama Luthuli and Sandisiwe Magadla

Coconut? Cheeseboy? Oreo? Certain types of black people have had these terms used on them. Three filmmakers head on a quest to find out what is black and who defines blackness. What is Black explores the complicated relationship three characters who grew up in white spaces have with their blackness and coming to terms with their black identity.

Lomhlaba Ungowethu! – This is our land!

Production by Nontokozo Mchunu, Tswelopele Maputla & Zandile Hlabangane

We explore a successful black-owned farm in Kwazulu Natal.
The community project operates under the Eyethu Trust after land was redistributed to the people of eMabomvini near Kranskop. The farmers talk of their history, their sugar cane and timber production and the real issues of land expropriation without compensation.

With land expropriation without compensation and the questions around sustainability this documentary is an provocative example of a successfully black-owned community farm that might answer some questions.

My grandfather – the pianist


Production by Zama Luthuli
Many black South Africans lost memories and documents due to being displaced during apartheid. Zama Luthuli’s family is no different. In this video she writes a letter to her late grandfather who she has a deep connection with though she has never met him. Her grandfather’s dream was to become a piano player, something that has truly inspired her. The theme of the video speaks to how black people in South Africa have been denied their dreams because of this country’s history.
Archive footage is used to tell this story because of the lack of documentation of Zama’s grandfather’s life.

Remembering Us Alive


Production by Sandisiwe Magadla
Sandisiwe Magadla looks at her family’s tradition of filming funeral videos to explore the representation of black people in film over the years. She looks at the practice of blackface and what it means to be remembered when these exist. She explains that she wants to document black people as well as to document herself to honour her people.

The man with an iron fist


Production by Nokwanda Dlamini
Domestic violence is a huge issue in South Africa especially in patriarchal societies such as Swaziland. My grandmother is testament this as a long suffering victim. This video details some of the reasons behind Makhinane Dlamini, my grandfather’s abuse patterns, not to absolve him but to frame him within a national history of violence. Colonialism, the second world war and the apartheid era in South Africa provide the background to this on the individual.

Black love


Production by Tswelopelo Maputla
Tswelopele’s first encounter with Black Consciousness was through her father who gave her his copy of Steve Biko’s “I write what I like” when she was in grade 10. Since then, she’s grown into a pro-black feminist thinker whose outfits are inspired by the 70s, an era she believes was great for fashion and intellect. In this documentary, Tswelopele explores black love through politics and fashion inspired by her parents.

Black and educated


Production by Zandile Hlabangane
This is a story about my grandfather, Sandile Hlabangane, who was passionate about education. He was a lecturer at a teaching college and was later promoted to a school principal. He passed down his love for education to his 7 children, one of them being my father, which resulted in me attending the best schools from primary school through to university.
Due to the 1953 Bantu Education Act, which was one of apartheid’s racist laws, African education served the interests of white supremacy and denied black people access to the opportunities of white South Africans. After my grandfather passed away in 1981, my father faced challenges in his matric year when his school was burnt down. Fortunately, he was one of only two students in his class that matriculated that year. My grandfather’s love for education was passed down to my father who now holds education as one of his main priorities for his children. Although I’ve never met him, my grandfather’s passion for education and learning has influenced the way I view education today.

From British to Boer


Production by Justin Cronje
Glen Cronjé married Lily Comley in 1968. This is a marriage between an Afrikaans person and a historically British person. The cultural significance of this is marked in South Africa’s history. This video tells the story of the Comley lineage as well as the Cronjé lineage up until present day. The past of the two cultures is vastly different and brutal at some points. Both cultures call South Africa home and subsequently unite decades on. check out shaved pussy on the beach.

My hair is not my pain


Production by Hannah Chibayambuya
This poem is about the love I have for my African hair and that others should have for their hair. It’s about no longer conforming to the beauty standards of the world. It’s about loving ourselves in an African way as opposed to a European way.

The irony Of Lord Kitchener’s legacy


Production by Courtney Jeftha
In this film, I tell the story about my relative Lord Horatio Herbert Kitchener and how the norms and values that he once upheld has changed as the world transitioned to post-colonial world. This story represents the way in which Kitchener’s bloodline has been mixed with African blood and illustrates the irony of his legacy and what he stood for. All that Kitchener has stood for and believed in is ironic because he has a relative like myself who is African and who comes from an Afrikaans background, everything that he did not stand for. 80 years after his death I have accepted my history and my European roots simply because I cannot do anything about it

Violet’s War


Production by Ciara O’Donoghue
This is just one of the many stories of my great grandmother, Violet Lilly Hartig. A feisty women with a sharp tongue and even sharper mind, growing up she was always an inspiration to me. During World War II when she was just 23 years old, Violet joined the South African Military Nursing service, working on the ambulance trains that carried soldiers from Durban to Pretoria. Just like the strong, powerful woman I knew, she did her best to save the lives and lift the spirits of the wounded soldiers aboard her train.